Head Of The Blue Chip

Humans are never entirely divorced from our technological environment. Whether we bathe in the glow of the instruments, or are riveted by technology's virtuosity, we should never forget that we are not machines, but that machines are us.’
Robert Pepperell 2006

Dianne Harris' work mimics and suggests future human development through the infiltration of technology, such as tapping into forming Stem cells to grow a human organ, sight using video-vision, micro and macro eyewear, inbuilt sensor devices and embedded data or knowledge chips.
 

The Head of The Blue Chip represents the mergence of man and machine and is a comment on how our lives and bodies have become part of today's intensifying technological revolution.

The phrase ‘Blue Chip’ was coined by Oliver Gingold of Dow Jones in 1923. It has been used ever since, originally in reference to high-priced stocks. Blue chip companies are known to weather downturns and operate profitably in the face of adverse economic conditions.

Evocative of the Big Brother, Orwellian prophecy, the head of the Blue Chip symbolizes the silent and watchful gaze of our surveillance state, of the hidden forces controlling our every move, the monitoring of data, the governance and control of every aspect of our lives through technological process which are; recorded, tracked, monitored, filtered and filmed.

The only place where we are not monitored or controlled is within our minds and within our thoughts, Freedom of thought is the nature of one’s reality, it is the place of understanding, of inspiration and of the moment. The mind is the private sphere to which no one but the owner has access. No-one else can ‘know our mind.’ They can only interpret what we consciously or unconsciously communicate. Mind manifests itself as the stream of consciousness.

The concept of right brain and left brain thinking developed from the research in the late 1960s of an American psychobiologist Roger W Sperry. He discovered that the human brain has two very different ways of thinking. One (the right brain) is visual and processes information in an intuitive and simultaneous way, looking first at the whole picture then the details. The other (the left brain) is verbal and processes information in an analytical and sequential way, looking first at the pieces then putting them together to get the whole. Sperry was awarded a Nobel Prize in 1981.

There are many theories of the mind and its function. The earliest recorded works on the mind are by Zarathushtra, Buddha, Plato, Aristotle, Adi Shankara, Indian and Islamic philosophers. Pre-scientific theories, based in theology, concentrated on the relationship between the mind and the soul, the supernatural, divine or god-given essence of the person. Modern theories, based on scientific understanding of the brain, theorize that the mind is a product of the brain and has both conscious and unconscious aspects.
Samuel Johnson, (18th Century poet, essayist, moralist, novelist) defined ‘conscious’ as ‘endowed with the power of knowing one's own thoughts and actions,’ and takes John Locke’s (17th century philosopher) own definition of ‘consciousness’ as ‘the perception of what passes in a man's own mind.’

Collective consciousness is our connection to nature, which attunes us to the mechanisms of the universe.

‘Yoga’ (originated c.2600–1900 B.C) means the state of perfection, which is attained through the mind. The state of yoga is realized when the sense of identification with the mind’s waves of perception, the self, consisting of the ego, the intellect and our complete record of meaning, is dissolved. Yoga is a state of enlightenment of the oneness of life, self or what many call God, and is achieved as the ripples of the sea of consciousness become motionless and the spirit of the perceiver knows who he is.
The path to enlightenment is a path within the In-Dweller, the knower of the mind. Aspirants purify and fortify their intellect to a higher knowledge beyond the field of mind into the experience of oneness.

Comisssioned by Museum of Archaeology & Anthropology, Cambridge 2010


 

The Head of the Blue Chip II depicts the convergence of man and machine. It mimics and suggests future human development through the infiltration of technology, such as customising stem cells to grow human organs, refashioning sight with video-vision and micro and macro bionic eye-implants, in-built sensor devices and embedded brain data or knowledge chips. The title refers to the phrase 'blue chip' used to describe economically stable high quality stock companies able to operate profitably in the face of adverse economic conditions. The artwork evokes the silent and watchful gaze of our surveillance state, evocative of the hidden forces controlling our every move, the recording and monitoring of data, the govenance and control of our lives through technological processes. One side of the brain shows what the eye sees and the other what it is thinking. Commissioned for the permanent collection of The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Cambridge. UK for Assembling Bodies 2009 - 2010.